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DIAGRAMS SO WE...

KNOW WHAT'S WHAT!!


The Situation...

Problem:

The toilet runs for hours and is wasting gallons of water!

Assessment:

The tank lever is getting stuck on the flat rod.  uh...and when I tried to bend the flat rod out of the way, it would seem, as one can see from the pic below, that the float ball snapped off and now resides at the bottom of the tank.  Note to all: the float ball apparently keeps the tank from overflowing; without it...yikes!  Make sure you close the water shut-off valve, if the float ball ever detaches!

Solution:

Install a new valve and shorten the chain on the tank lever to raise the foam floater.


Well, Time to Get Started!

 

The hardware store is full of beings ready to share their knowledge...well opinions...lol, even if sometimes those opinions are really wrong...There are the by the book opinions and the "well, you don't really need that extra bolt opinions".  The plumbing aisle is still a male dominated one and the smirks were not  contained, as I picked the sales person's

 

brain regarding my project.  I offered to only mildly impatient onlookers that this was a plumbing emergency! I do not know much about plumbing, but I never have a doubt that I will be able to figure it out. I mean, I have a basic understanding how things work...I often get  conflicting information, but somewhere between the aisles of the hardware store and YouTube I'm set!


The Materials

 

The salesperson working the plumbing area, sold me on large adjustable (groove joint) pliers , a new valve and a new tank lever. You will also need a ruler, a sponge, standard adjustable 

 

pliers  and a bowl (or bucket possibly).  It turns out I had a the groove joint pliers already; so this one, will be going back tomorrow!   

#projectjustgot cheaper


Back at home...

 

I had to make the quick transformation from Mild mannerly me

To

 Wonder Plumber! lol...

 
 

...and with a snap of the fingers...

 
 

I was ready to go!

 

First I needed to remove the old Fill Valve.

1. Turn off the water at the water supply line (turn clockwise).  Flush toilet and use your sponge to remove the extra water (and sediment), that is left in the tank after flushing (not to be confused with the bowl - check your anatomy of a toilet).

2. Next remove the water supply line coupling nut.  The directions will tell you counter-clockwise, but from squatting it is actually clockwise.  I always followed the little diddy, "lefty loosy, righty tighty", so this was confusing.  

I looked at some plumbing sites and they confirmed that the directions are from the perspective of being viewed from the ‘end’ of the threads, as if I were laying on the ground looking up at it like one does under a car to do an oil change.  When you are looking straight on at the pipe, one would perceive and probably label the necessary turn to be a clockwise turn.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

...sludge

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

to loosen

I would call this clockwise.  A plumber would call it counter-clockwise.  This direction loosens the nut.

3. Following this you must remove the locknut, located under the tank, that secures the fill valve to the tank.  Turn clockwise to do so. It is only necessary to hand tighten these nuts.  The previous plumber had tightened this too much, so I really had to bend 

 

 

 

 

 
 

4. Once these nuts are removed there should be nothing left attaching the fill valve to the tank.  

 

5. Place a little bucket or bowl under or towel under the hole where the valve will be removed (to catch any tiny extra drips). Now you can safely remove the old fill valve.  

 down there to loosen it.  Now I understand how easily plumbers can get a bad name.  

No Cracks please!

 

It is only necessary to hand tighten these nuts.  The previous -

Now I understand how easily plumbers can get a bad name.

Now I understand how easily plumbers can get a bad name.

 

 plumber had tightened this too much, so I really had to bend down there to loosen it.

 
 
 

The bucket wasn't necessary for me!


 

workin' up a sweat!

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Next install the new fill valve.

 

1. First place the Shank Washer on the Threaded Shank (the flat side of the washer should be facing upwards).

 
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2. Next place the Threaded Shank in the Fill Valve hole that you just removed the old valve from (on the left side of the base of the tank). 

Note: Do not secure the valve back under the tank, as of yet.  

 
 

3. Once the Fill Valve is sitting in the hole, the distance from the top of the valve to the top of the overflow Pipe should be 3 inches.  This is an industry standard.  This should set the Critical Level Mark "CL" (embossed (same color) in the plastic of the Float Cup, so it could not be more difficult to read), at 1" above the Overflow Pipe.

 
 

4. Twist the Threaded Shank clockwise, or counterclockwise to lengthen or shorten it which will assist you in obtaining the desired measurements above.  Once you think you have the correct specifications, please check that the tank lid will fit back on properly, because it would be a shame to have done all of this and find out once you were finished the lid didn't fit!

 
 

5. Once you have satisfied these measurement requirements, point the nipple of the Fill Valve, toward the Overflow Pipe.

  

 
 

LOL!

 

6. Then you can fasten the Valve from underneath the tank with the Locknut (or Coupling Nut). 

Note: Make sure the float cup isn't touching the walls of the tank nor the tank lever or flush valve.

 
 

Twist by hand but not so tight that you cannot get if off by hand later!

 

7.  Place the Refill Clip on the right edge of the Overflow Pipe and attach the Refill tube from the nipple on the float cup to the refill clip.  The tube that I was provided with was too long, so that's where the scissors come in at!  Don't cut too much!

 

Note: After these steps have been completed, you are almost ready!

pic above was taken after the valve installation was complete. Obviously you will not have water running! :)

pic above was taken after the valve installation was complete. Obviously you will not have water running! :)

 
 
Observe...the tube!   The manufacturers   instructions are filled with loads of warnings, that I am sure my gentle readers will not need

Observe...the tube!

The manufacturers instructions are filled with loads of warnings, that I am sure my gentle readers will not need

 Like:  Do not shove refill tube down overflow pipe.  This may cause significant water waste.   There will be no shoving of anything down your pipes...

 Like: Do not shove refill tube down overflow pipe.  This may cause significant water waste.  There will be no shoving of anything down your pipes...


Finally you can reattach the water supply connector. 

1. Here you will be working backwards.  First attaching Water Supply Line Coupling Nut and then turning on the water from the Supply Line.  

 

Note: The manufacturer instructions for my Fill Valve makes a suggestion for one to replace the water supply connector if it is over 5 years old or worn to look.  Probably a fantastic idea, but one I had neither time nor money for.

 
Very   Important : Remember to hand-tighten the Supply Coupling Nut to avoid damage to the supply line and flooding, etc.

Very Important: Remember to hand-tighten the Supply Coupling Nut to avoid damage to the supply line and flooding, etc.


Time to turn on the water

1. Once the water supply line is secured, turn on the water supply and check for any leakage.  

Note: If there is a leak hand-tighten Locknut on tank or supply line, depending where the leak may be coming from. 

 
 

The time has come to flush. Drum roll please...

 1. Assuming all is good let it fill up and then flush the toilet!!

 

All in a days work!

 
 

I intalled a Fluidmaster 400A Fill Valve.  I have NEVER installed another model.  Not being a plumber or experienced in any sort of manner...I can only assume they are similar.  Here is the customer service number listed by the company if you have real technical questions: (800)631-2011.  

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